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Beep baseball lets blind players step up to the plate

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) -- A baseball tournament like no other was held in Indianapolis.

Beep baseball allows the blind and visually impaired to play baseball.

"When I was told about this sport, I was very enthusiastic and very ready to participate," Indianapolis Thunder player Marc Morris said.

Morris is in his second year playing beep baseball.

"If you want to play a competitive sport and you're willing to put in the time, you can absolutely do it," he said.

He and others who are blind or visually impaired played in the round robin tournament against teams from St. Louis, Cleveland and Chicago.

Indianapolis Thunder General Manager & pitcher Darnell Booker has been with the league for over a decade.

"In between the lines, it's competition," Booker said. "Afterwards, it's the camaraderie of the teams getting together, congratulating, things like that, but it's a very competitive sport."

Beep baseball is six innings.

Six players take to the outfield along with spotters to help guide them to hit balls.

The opposing team pitches to its own batter.

The ball and 4 ft. high bases, first and third only, make distinct sounds so players know where to swing and where to run.

Here, players don't circle the bases like in traditional baseball.

If the outfielder picks up the ball before the batter reaches the base, the batter's out.

If not, the batter's scored a run.

Rules aside, players say, this take me out to the ballgame may be a little different, but that only increases their dedication.

"Just because you're blind or visually impaired doesn't mean you can give up on life, give up on sports," Booker said.

"I love it," Morris said. "If it was possible, I would have this sport be a year round sport, absolutely."

The goal of these games is to make it to the World Series in Minnesota in August.

 
 
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